Right Whale Season Gone Wrong
2018: Injured Right Whale. From GA DNR Flickr. (Required credit: Sea to Shore Alliance, taken under NOAA research permit 20556)

Right Whale Season Gone Wrong

This article is an excerpt from a newsletter from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. We at GDEP thought it was an exceptionally-written and relevant article, and have chosen to share it on our blog this week in lieu of…

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Conservation on the Chopping Block

Here at GDEP, we prefer to keep matters of marine science apolitical. However, important scientific research, education, and funding comes from some key governmental organizations. Today, for the second year in a row, one of these vital support systems is…

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Gone (Ethical) Whale Watching
Photo Credit: Michael Dawes. http://www.flickr.com/photos/tk_five_0/show/

Gone (Ethical) Whale Watching

This blog post is written by Cassidy Lord. Dolphins are cute, right? So cute you could jump right in with them? Give them a big hug and maybe a snack for the road? Well...don’t. Human interactions with marine mammals are…

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Do You Hear What I Hear?

This blog article was written by a guest writer, Jessica Wenclawiak. On March 15, 2000, scientists Ken Balcomb and Diane Claridge walked along the beach in the North Bahamas and quickly became involved in a disturbing event: 17 marine animals,…

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The Hairy Science of Cloning a Mammoth
A rendering of the extinct wooly mammoth Photo credit: National Geographic Kids

The Hairy Science of Cloning a Mammoth

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.” ~John Muir Many of our GDEP blog pieces to date have featured species-specific information or issues explicitly impacting marine organisms and systems.…

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It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a…SnotBot?
Photo Credit: Randy Jay Braun

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a…SnotBot?

This blog article was written by Cassidy Lord. As Unmanned Aerial Vehicles gain popularity for recreational and commercial use, researchers are finding innovative methods for collecting photographic and spatial data.  A recent story circulated in popular media tells of Ocean Alliance’s…

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Sick and Stranded: The Story of Cetacean Morbillivirus
Rescue crew helps stranded dolphins. Credit: International Fund for Animal Welfare

Sick and Stranded: The Story of Cetacean Morbillivirus

Do dolphins get measles?  Not exactly, but the disease that’s been ravaging whale and dolphin populations worldwide, called cetacean morbillivirus (CMV), is in the same family of viruses (Paramyxoviridae) that causes measles in humans.  Morbillivirus has strains that affect non-cetacean…

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Patagonian Graveyard
Sei whale washed up at Elliot Links beach, Arbroath. 40 foot long. Photo credit to Toxic Web on Flickr.com

Patagonian Graveyard

This blog entry highlights Claudia Gleib's article "Death by Killer Algae" in Hakai Magazine. Read the full article at https://www.hakaimagazine.com/features/death-killer-algae/. Stumbling upon a beached whale the size of a semi-truck is a startling sight, but not a wholly unusual one…

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Good For You, Good For The Ocean

The ocean does a lot for us. On the heels of Giving Tuesday, consider incorporating these resources into your daily and weekly routine to help return the favor.    It’s that season again. Holiday music is filling the air. Christmas…

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And Then There Were 30

The vaquita—the “panda of the ocean”—has garnered much attention over the past few years having earned the unfortunate title of most-endangered marine mammal. Vaquitas are small porpoises whose numbers have plunged by 90% in the last 5 years alone. Some…

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